The range of adverbs used to refer to time, frequency and degree increases at the A2 level, and learners begin to use adverbs of manner, linking, focus, sequencing, certainty and stance.

Time

A2 level learners can use a limited range of adverbs (yesterday, just, now, already) to refer to the timing of an event.

A2 50x33   Yesterday I went shopping. (Cambridge English: Key; Hungarian)

A2 50x33   I’ve just seen your mail. (Cambridge English: Key; French)

A2 50x33   I am working very hard now because I want to earn some money. (Skills for Life: Entry 2; Spanish - Latin American)

A2 50x33   [talking about a film] I’ve already seen it. (Cambridge English: Key; Portuguese)

Frequency

Learners at the A2 level also use an increasing range of adverbs (usually, often, never, weekly) to talk about frequency.

A2 50x33   People usually try to eat their breakfast between 7 and 9 am. (Skills for Life: Entry 2; Polish)

A2 50x33   I often go to the Shanghai Museum. (Cambridge English: Key; Chinese)

A2 50x33   You never remember anything! (Cambridge English: Key; Catalan)

A2 50x33   Do I have to pay weekly or monthly? (Skills for Life: Entry 2; Portuguese)

Degree with adjectives

Learners use a limited range of degree adverbs (so, quite, too) to modify adjectives.

A2 50x33   I went to Vinpearland. It’s so beautiful. (Cambridge English: Key for Schools; Vietnamese)

A2 50x33   It was quite expensive. It cost £100. (Cambridge English: Key; Spanish - European)

A2 50x33   The weather was too hot. (Cambridge English: Key for Schools; Tamil)

Degree with verbs

They can use a limited range of adverbs and adverb phrases (so much, a lot) with verbs to indicate degree or intensity.

A2 50x33   I am looking forward to seeing you so much! (Skills for Life: Entry 2; Japanese)

A2 50x33   We listened to music and we danced a lot too. (Cambridge English: Key; Spanish - Latin American)

Manner

A2 level learners can use a limited range of manner adverbs and adverb phrases to modify how something happens.

A2 50x33   … both the players played well. (Cambridge English: Key; Tamil)

A2 50x33   You must go straight, then turn left. (Cambridge English: Key; Italian)

A2 50x33   Some of them can swim very fast. (Cambridge English: Key Chinese)

A2 50x33   [talking about a bike] It’s very colourfull, and it goes very quickly. (Cambridge English: Key; French)

Linking

They can also use a limited range of adverbs (also, so, however) to show a relationship between two clauses or sentences.

A2 50x33   I also bought some t-shirts. (Cambridge English: Key; Greek)

A2 50x33   [talking about paint] I don’t like green, so I decided to use blue. Could you help me to paint my room? (Cambridge English: Key; Portuguese)

A2 50x33   Yesterday I bought some clothes: trousers and skirts. However, the clothes were cheap. (Cambridge English: Key; Spanish - European)

Focus

Learners are able to use a limited range of adverbs (only, just) to focus on or point to something.

A2 50x33   [talking about a class] It’s only two hours. (Cambridge English: Key; Spanish - European)

A2 50x33   It was only €70. It is pink. It looks very nice. (Cambridge English: Key; Turkish)

A2 50x33   It was just £15. (Cambridge English: Key; Japanese)

Sequencing

They can also use a limited range of adverbs and adverb phrases (first, then, after that) to order segments of discourse.

A2 50x33   First we had dinner in a very expensive restaurant, then we went to a disco. (Cambridge English: Key; Italian)

A2 50x33   We can meet at 6 pm at my house, and then we can get to the sports centre by bus. (Cambridge English: Key; Chinese)

A2 50x33   [talking about games at a children’s party] First, we played housie and blind man’s bluff. After that a magician showed us a lot of magic tricks. (Cambridge English: Key; Gujarati)

Certainty

Learners at A2 level can use a limited range of adverbs (maybe, perhaps) to indicate degrees of certainty.

A2 50x33   Or maybe we can walk there, because it’s not far from my house. (Cambridge English: Key; Chinese)

A2 50x33   Perhaps I left it in your living room. (Cambridge English: Key; Czech)

Stance

Learners can make effective use of a limited range of adverbs (actually, unfortunately, of course, I’m sorry) to indicate an attitude or viewpoint.

A2 50x33   It’s very nice that you’re going to help me to paint my bedroom. Actually, I want you to decide what colour my room should be. (Cambridge English: Key; Thai)

A2 50x33   Unfortunately, my team lost. (Cambridge English: Key; Others)

A2 50x33   [talking about a watch] It costs €450 and of course it is black. You know black is my favorite color. (Cambridge English: Key; Turkish)

A2 50x33   I’m sorry you can’t find it. (Cambridge English: Key; Greek)

So, at the A2 level, learners expand significantly their range of adverbs and the contexts in which they use them. This expansion in the range of adverbs available to learners is central to learner progress as they continue through the CEFR levels.

Cambridge University Press